Hello everyone! Hope that you’re doing well during this Stay-at-Home advisory! We would like to share some books about leadership with everyone! This will allow you to work on some leadership skills at home and will keep you busy!


Business

Start Something That Matters
Blake Mycoskie

In Start Something That Matters, Blake Mycoskie tells the story of TOMS, one of the fastest-growing shoe companies in the world, and combines it with lessons learned from such other innovative organizations such as Method Products, charity: water, FEED Projects, and TerraCycle. Blake presents the six simple keys for creating or transforming your own life and business, from discovering your core story to being resourceful without resources; from overcoming fear and doubt to incorporating giving into every aspect of your life.
Recommended by Adrian Gage, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs/Director of Residence Life and Housing

Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
Simon Sinek

In studying the leaders who’ve had the greatest influence in the world, Simon Sinek discovered that they all think, act, and communicate in the exact same way—and it’s the complete opposite of what everyone else does. Drawing on a wide range of real-life stories, Sinek weaves together a clear vision of what it truly takes to lead and inspire. This book is for anyone who wants to inspire others or who wants to find someone to inspire them.
Recommended by Adrian Gage, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs/Director of Residence LIfe and Housing

Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements
Tom Rath

Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements provides you with a holistic view of what contributes to your wellbeing over a lifetime. Written in a conversational style, this book is filled with fascinating research and innovative ideas for boosting your wellbeing in each of these five areas. By the time you finish reading this book, you’ll have a better understanding of what makes life worthwhile. This will enable you to enjoy each day and get more out of your life — while boosting the wellbeing of your friends, family members, colleagues and others in your community.
Recommended by Sarah Potrikus, Assistant Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Development


Children

Oh, The Places You’ll Go
Dr. Seuss

From soaring to high heights and seeing great sights to being left in a lurch on a prickle-ly perch, Dr. Seuss addresses life’s ups and downs with his trademark humorous verse and illustrations, while encouraging readers to find the success that lies within. In a starred review,Booklist notes, “Seuss’s message is simple but never sappy: life may be a ‘Great Balancing Act,’ but through it all ‘There’s fun to be done.’” A perennial favorite and a perfect gift for anyone starting a new phase in their life!
Recommended by Dr. Linda Larrivee, Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences

Miss Rumphius
Barbara Cooney

Barbara Cooney’s story of Alice Rumphius, who longed to travel the world, live in a house by the sea, and do something to make the world more beautiful, has a timeless quality that resonates with each new generation. The countless lupines that bloom along the coast of Maine are the legacy of the real Miss Rumphius, the Lupine Lady, who scattered lupine seeds everywhere she went.
Recommended by Dr. Linda Larrivee, Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences


Classics

Moby-Dick: or, The Whale
Herman Melville

Moby-Dick is the story of an eerily compelling madman pursuing an unholy war against a creature as vast and dangerous and unknowable as the sea itself. But more than just a novel of adventure, more than an encyclopedia of whaling lore and legend, the book can be seen as part of its author’s lifelong meditation on America. Written with wonderfully redemptive humor, Moby-Dick is also a profound inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.
Recommended by Dr. Russ Pottle, Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences

The Razor’s Edge
Somerset Maugham

Larry Darrell is a young American in search of the absolute. The progress of this spiritual odyssey involves him with some of Maugham’s most brillant characters – his fiancee Isabel, whose choice between love and wealth have lifelong repercussions, and Elliot Templeton, her uncle, a classic expatriate American snob.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Betty Smith

The story of young, sensitive, and idealistic Francie Nolan and her bittersweet formative years in the slums of Williamsburg has enchanted and inspired millions of readers for more than sixty years. By turns overwhelming, sublime, heartbreaking, and uplifting, the daily experiences of the unforgettable Nolans are raw with honesty and tenderly threaded with family connectedness — in a work of literary art that brilliantly captures a unique time and place as well as incredibly rich moments of universal experience.
Recommended by Dr. Linda Larrivee, Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences

The Trial
Franz Kafka

The Trial is the terrifying tale of Josef K., a respectable bank officer who is suddenly and inexplicably arrested and must defend himself against a charge about which he can get no information. Whether read as an existential tale, a parable, or a prophecy of the excesses of modern bureaucracy wedded to the madness of totalitarianism, The Trial has resonated with chilling truth for generations of readers.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs


Cultural Awareness

35 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say: Surprising Things We Say That Widen the Diversity Gap
Maura Cullen

Even well-intended people can cause harm. Have you ever heard yourself or someone else say: “Some of my best friends are… (Black, White, Asian, etc.)”? “I don’t think of you as… (Gay, Disabled, Jewish, etc.)”? “I don’t see color, I’m colorblind”? These statements and dozens like them can build a divide between us and the people we interact with. Though well-intended, they often widen the diversity gap sometimes causing irreparable harm personally and professionally. If you’ve ever wanted to be more effective in your communication with others, or have been afraid of saying the wrong thing, then this concise guide is essential to becoming more inclusive and diversity-smart.
Recommended by Linzy Martinez, Assistant Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Development

Invisible Man
Ralph Ellison

A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of “the Brotherhood”, and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be.
Recommended by Nathan Angelo, Assistant Professor of History & Political Science

Night
Elie Wiesel

Born in the town of Sighet, Transylvania, ElieWiesel was a teenager when he and his family were taken from their home in 1944 to Auschwitz concentration camp, and then to Buchenwald. Night is the terrifying record of Elie Wiesel’s memories of the death of his family, the death of his own innocence, and his despair as a deeply observant Jew confronting the absolute evil of man.
Recommended by Dr. Linda Larrivee, Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences

Pedagogy of the Oppressed
Paulo Freire

First published in Portuguese in 1968, Pedagogy of the Oppressed was translated and published in English in 1970. Paulo Freire’s work has helped to empower countless people throughout the world and has taken on special urgency in the United States and Western Europe, where the creation of a permanent underclass among the underprivileged and minorities in cities and urban centers is ongoing.
Recommended by Dr. Roberta Kyle, Associate Vice President/Dean of Graduate and Continuing Education

The Politics of Reality:  Essays in Feminist Theory
Marilyn Frye

Politics of Reality includes essays that examine sexism, the exploitation of women, the gay rights movement and other topics from a feminist perspective.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs


History

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
Daniel James Brown

Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.
Recommended by Sarah Potrikus, Assistant Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Development

The History and Sociology of Genocide
Frank Chalk & Kurt Jonassohn

Genocide is not an invention of the twentieth-century, say Frank Chalk and Kurt Jonassohn in this absorbing book, but has occurred throughout history in all parts of the world. This study—the first comprehensive survey of the history and sociology of genocide—presents over two dozen examples of the one-sided mass slaughter of peoples, spanning the centuries from antiquity to the present.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War
Michael Shaara

After 30 years and with three million copies in print, Michael Shaara’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War classic, The Killer Angels, remains as vivid and powerful as the day it was originally published. July 1863. In the four most bloody and courageous days of our nation’s history, two armies fight for two conflicting dreams. One dreams of freedom, the other of a way of life. More than rifles and bullets are carried into battle. The soldiers carry memories. Promises. Love. And more than men fall on those Pennsylvania fields. Bright futures, untested innocence, and pristine beauty are also the casualties of war.
Recommended by Dr. Lois Wims, Provost of Academic Affairs

The Muqaddimah:  An Introduction to History
Ibn Khaldun

The Muqaddimah, often translated as “Introduction” or “Prolegomenon,” is the most important Islamic history of the modern world. Written by the great fourteenth-century Arab scholar Ibn Khaldûn (d. 1406), this monumental work established the foundations of several fields of knowledge, including the philosophy of history, sociology, ethnography, and economics.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
Doris Kearns Goodwin

Acclaimed historian Doris Kearns Goodwin illuminates Lincoln’s political genius in this highly original work, as the one-term congressman and prairie lawyer rises from obscurity to prevail over three gifted rivals of national reputation to become president. We view the long, horrifying struggle from the vantage of the White House as Lincoln copes with incompetent generals, hostile congressmen, and his raucous cabinet. He overcomes these obstacles by winning the respect of his former competitors, and in the case of Seward, finds a loyal and crucial friend to see him through.
Recommended by Dr. Lois Wims, Provost of Academic Affairs

The Wretched of the Earth
Frantz Fanon

The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage and frustration of colonized peoples, and the role of violence in effecting historical change, the book incisively attacks the twin perils of post-independence colonial politics: the disenfranchisement of the masses by the elites on the one hand, and inter-tribal and interfaith animosities on the other.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs


Leadership

Dare to Lead
Brene Brown

Brené Brown teaches us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong and brave the wilderness. Leadership is not about titles, status and power over people. Leaders are people who hold themselves accountable for recognizing the potential in people and ideas, and developing that potential. This is a book for everyone who is ready to choose courage over comfort, make a difference and lead.
Recommended by Linzy Martinez, Assistant Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Development

Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t
Simon Sinek

How do you inspire deep trust and commitment to the company and one another? He cites the Marine Corps for having found a way to build a culture in which men and women are willing to risk their lives, because they know others would do the same for them. It’s not brainwashing; it’s actually based on the biology of how and when people are naturally at their best. If businesses could adopt this supportive mentality, employees would be more motivated to take bigger risks, because they’d know their colleagues and company would back them up, no matter what. Drawing on powerful and inspiring stories, Sinek shows how to sustain an organization’s WHY while continually adding people to the mix.
Recommended by Sarah Potrikus, Assistant Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Development


Memoir

Anchor & Flares: A Memoir of Motherhood, Hope, and Service
Kate Braestrup

Kate Braestrup’s life was transformed by the loss of her husband; now Kate faces the possibility that she may lose her son. As Kate examines the twinned emotions of faith and fear – inspired by the families she meets as a chaplain and by her son’s journey towards purpose and family hood – she learns that the threats we can’t predict will rip us apart and knit us together.
Recommended by Brittany Rende, Intramural Program Manager/Assistant Sports Information Coordinator

Letters to a Young Poet
Rainer Maria Rilke

Born in 1875, the great German lyric poet Rainer Maria Rilke published his first collection of poems in 1898 and went on to become renowned for his delicate depiction of the workings of the human heart. Drawn by some sympathetic note in his poems, young people often wrote to Rilke with their problems and hopes. From 1903 to 1908 Rilke wrote a series of remarkable responses to a young, would-be poet on poetry and on surviving as a sensitive observer in a harsh world. Those letters, still a fresh source of inspiration and insight, are accompanied here by a chronicle of Rilke’s life that shows what he was experiencing in his own relationship to life and work when he wrote them.
Recommended by Julie Glovin, Counselor

The Diary of Anne Frank
Anne Frank

Thirteen-year-old Anne Frank, with her parents and sister and four other people, went into hiding in the sealed-off back rooms of an Amsterdam office building in 1942, when the Nazi invaders intensified their persecution of Jews. Anne’s astonishingly intimate diary was found by accident. With a touch of genius it records the strains of her unusual life, the problems of her unfolding womanhood, her falling in love, her unswerving faith in her religion. And it reveals the shining nobility of her spirit.
Recommended by Dr. Linda Larrivee, Dean of the School of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences


Philosophy

Being and Nothingness
Jean-Paul Sartre

Jean-Paul Sartre develops a philosophical account in support of his existentialism, dealing with topics such as consciousness, perception, social philosophy, self-deception, the existence of nothingness”, psychoanalysis, and the question of free will. While a prisoner of war in 1940 and 1941, Sartre read Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time (1927), which uses the method of Husserlian phenomenology as a lens for examining ontology. Sartre attributed the course of his own philosophical inquiries to his exposure to this work.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

How to Think:  A Survival Guide for a World at Odds
Alan Jacobs

How to Think is a contrarian treatise on why we’re not as good at thinking as we assume – but how recovering this lost art can rescue our inner lives from the chaos of modern life. In this smart, endlessly entertaining book, Jacobs diagnoses the many forces that act on us to prevent thinking–forces that have only worsened in the age of Twitter, “alternative facts,” and information overload–and he also dispels the many myths we hold about what it means to think well.
Recommended by Barry Maloney, Worcester State University President

On the Genealogy of Morality
Friedrich Nietzsche

The Genealogy of Morality consists of three essays exploring morality and its origins where Nietzsche makes ample use of his training as a philologist. These works contain Nietzsche’s most thorough and clear expression of his psychological philosophy.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

Society of the Spectacle
Guy Debord 

Few works of political and cultural theory have been as enduringly provocative as Guy Debord’s Society of the Spectacle. From its publication amid the social upheavals of the 1960s up to the present, the volatile theses of this book have decisively transformed debates on the shape of modernity, capitalism and everyday life in the late twentieth century.
Recommended by Nathan Angelo, Assistant Professor of History & Political Science

The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation
Jacques Ranciere

This is a  story of Joseph Jacotot, an exiled French schoolteacher who discovered in 1818 an unconventional teaching method that spread panic throughout the learned community of Europe. Jacotot found himself able to teach in French to Flemish students who knew no French; knowledge, Jacotot concluded, was not necessary to teach, nor explication necessary to learn. The results of this unusual experiment in pedagogy led him to announce that all people were equally intelligent.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs


Psychology

Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges
Amy Cuddy

Have you ever left a nerve-racking challenge and immediately wished for a do over? Maybe after a job interview, a performance, or a difficult conversation? The very moments that require us to be genuine and commanding can instead cause us to feel phony and powerless. Too often we approach our lives’ biggest hurdles with dread, execute them with anxiety, and leave them with regret. By accessing our personal power, we can achieve “presence,” the state in which we stop worrying about the impression we’re making on others and instead adjust the impression we’ve been making on ourselves.
Recommended by Brittany Rende, Intramural Program Manager/Assistant Sports Information Coordinator

Self Determination Theory: Basic Psycholgical Needs in Motivation, Development, and Wellness
Richard Ryan & Edward Deci

Self-determination theory (SDT) provides a framework for understanding the factors that promote motivation and healthy psychological and behavioral functioning. In this authoritative work, the co developers of the theory comprehensively examine SDT’s conceptual underpinnings (including its six mini-theories), empirical evidence base, and practical applications across the lifespan. The volume synthesizes a vast body of research on how supporting–or thwarting–people’s basic needs for competence, relatedness, and autonomy affects their development and well-being.
Recommended by Jacquelyn Raftery-Helmer, Assistant Professor of Psychology

What Made Maddy Run: The Secret Struggles and Tragic Death of an All American Teen
Kate Fagan

From noted ESPN commentator and journalist Kate Fagan, the heartbreaking and vital story of college athlete Madison Holleran, whose death by suicide rocked the University of Pennsylvania campus and whose life reveals with haunting detail and uncommon understanding the struggle of young people suffering from mental illness today.
Recommended by Brittany Rende, Intramural Program Manager/Assistant Sports Information Coordinator


Self Help

Being Perfect
Anna Quindlen

In Being Perfect, Quindlen shares wisdom that, perhaps without knowing it, you have longed to hear: about “the perfection trap,” the price you pay when you become ensnared in it, and the key to setting yourself free. She believes that when your success looks good to the world but doesn’t feel good in your heart, it isn’t success at all.
Recommended by Adrian Gage, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs/Director of Residence LIfe and Housing

The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter-And How to Make the Most of Them Now
Meg Jay

Drawing from a decade of work with hundreds of twenty-something clients and students, The Defining Decade weaves the latest science of the twenty-something years with behind-closed-doors stories from twenty-somethings themselves. The result is a provocative read that provides the tools necessary to make the most of your twenties, and shows us how work, relationships, personality, social networks, identity, and even the brain can change more during this decade than at any other time in adulthood-if we use the time wisely.
Recommended by Brittany Rende, Intramural Program Manager/Assistant Sports Information Coordinator

The Purpose Driven Life:  What on Earth Am I Here For
Rick Warren

Rick Warren will guide you through a personal forty-day spiritual journey that will transform your answer to life’s most important question: What on earth am I here for? Knowing God’s purpose for creating you will reduce your stress, focus your energy, simplify your decisions, give meaning to your life, and most important, prepare you for eternity.
Recommended by Stacey Luster, Assistant Vice President for Human Resources, Payroll, and Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity


Sociology

The Last Lecture
Randy Pausch

A lot of professors give talks titled ‘The Last Lecture’. When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn’t have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave, ‘Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams’, wasn’t about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because time is all you have and you may find one day that you have less than you think). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living.
Recommended by Patrick Hare, Assistant for Governmental & Community Affairs

The Marx-Engels Reader
Robert Tucker

This edition of the leading anthology provides the essential writings of Marx and Engels—those works necessary for an introduction to Marxist thought and ideology. The volume is arranged to show both the chronological and the thematic development of the two great thinkers. Selections range in coverage from history, society, and economics, to politics, philosophy, and the strategy and tactics of social revolution.
Recommended by Dr. Henry Theriault, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

Written by WSU Student Involvement

The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership Development at Worcester State University believes strongly in the diverse range of leaders that exists on our campus. This blog was created to recognize and celebrate the great work being done by the members of the WSU community. We also aim to share the many resources that contribute to the development of the leaders in our community. Please join us in celebrating the beauty of leadership at WSU.

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